Have Great Broadband, But Still Have Slow Wi-Fi?

Installing A Mesh Network Could Be Your Solution To Wi-Fi Shadows And Dark Spotsmesh disk, mesh network, broadband network, home network, home broadband

While your broadband provider gives you incredible internet access speeds, you may find that too many users at the same time and the distance you are from your router can have a significant effect on the speed that you’re able to surf the web. What can you do about it?

Several things can affect the speed you get when you’re actually browsing, the distance from your router, the number of people trying to use the internet at the same time, walls, or even heavy furniture can all have a detrimental effect. While the position of your router is important, there are some things which just can’t be overcome that way, so you may need to invest in a mesh network to solve dark spots.

The Further You Go The Slower The Flow

Wireless routers can only deliver a strong signal for a limited range. As you get toward the extent of that range you will see speeds slowing as the weaker signal affects the amount of data your devices can receive. The router is designed to have a limited range as making them more powerful would mean that householders would find that all their neighbours’ Wi-Fi signal was coming through as strongly as their own, which causes a variety of problems including ‘noise’, interference and tethering problems for devices which automatically connect to the strongest signal.

So people living in a larger than average home, or who want to extend their Wi-Fi’s reach into the garden have to find a way of broadening the reach of their reception. One of the best solutions available at the moment is a mesh network, a series of devices (usually in the form of ‘disks’ or ‘satellites’) which can be dotted around the home to improve signal wherever you are. Read more

How To Find Out If You Can Get Full Fibre Broadband In Your Area

The government aims to get almost all (at least 95%) of homes in the country connected to an ultrafast full fibre broadband network within the next few years, and Briant Broadband’s partners, CityFibre are one of the infrastructure companies who’ve been give the task of doing that.

If you’re interested in getting your broadband from Worthing’s only genuinely local broadband internet service provider, you can check if your home is in an area where Full Fibre is available instantly by entering your postcode into our Full Fibre Broadband Checker.

If your home or business premises are covered you’ll have the opportunity to order right now, and we could have you connected incredibly quickly. (Our record is 30 minutes from receiving a query on Facebook to having the customer online!)

If you’re not currently in an area which has lightning fast full fibre connectivity at the moment, you’ll be given the option to choose our Superfast Wireless. Because of the logistics of rolling out a national infrastructure programme, some remote and rural areas won’t have fibre broadband on their streets for some time yet. What our wireless option does is give you the choice of taking up a service which delivers more than twice the speeds which are currently available using the copper cable phone network which is currently in place.

Because all of Briant Broadband’s packages are flexible, once Full Fibre does come to areas where Wireless is currently the only other option, you will be able to upgrade to faster plans without admin fees, no line rental, and without having to change contracts or broadband providers.

And if you are in an area which can be connected right now, you get that choice too! So if you find that the speed you originally opted for isn’t fast enough for your family of movie buffs and gamers, you can change up any time you like with a quick phone call to our Worthing based office on 01903 221999. You can also change down if you’re not using anything like the amount of data you anticipated, or pause your plan altogether if you’re going to be away from home for 30 days or more. That’s right! If you’re not using the data, you don’t have to pay for it, and we won’t even charge you an admin fee to pause it either!

We aim to get all of our customers connected within 48 hours of receiving their order, and we promise to give you a month’s FREE broadband if we can’t meet that commitment, we also give you each a month’s free internet when you introduce a friend to Briant Broadband. It’s a new way of doing things, but it’s our take on fast, friendly, expert local customer service.

How Does Broadband Internet Get From Your ISP To Your Computer?

wireless router, wifi router, router, wireless, digital broadband, broadband, digital, wireless, full fibre, fast fibre, superfast fibre, ultrafast fibre, What technology you have connecting your home to the World Wide Web will drastically affect the speed at which you can access broadband internet.

Up until recently almost all internet infrastructure would have been via ADSL, essentially the old phone cable networking which has been with us for generations. While the internet was a luxury that not everybody needed low speeds and a limited network were sufficient, but now that it’s considered a utility, and a part of the basket of goods by which the retail price index is measured.

Today, with the unrelenting demand for faster and faster broadband the old copper cables can’t cope. The technology was originally designed to transmit the human voice to other people (relatively) nearby. The human voice operates at around 50Hz and most phone calls people make were to friends and neighbours who live nearby. However, by introducing the internet to the equation the phone lines now need to deliver data at 2.45GHz all over the world.

To overcome the limitations a number of solutions have been invented. First among these is Fibre To The Cabinet (FTTC). FTTC is based on fibre optic technology, taking advantage of the fact that by using light instead of electrical impulses to transmit data it can deliver speeds many times that which cable alone can provide. FTTC is something of a compromise in  terms of data speeds and convenience of installation. Fibre optic lines are installed as far as the kerbside cabinets you find at the end of most streets. From there they use the existing copper wires to connect your home to the web. That copper leg does slow the data down, however, because the rest of the data’s journey is fibre optic, the overall system is much faster than copper cable alone. FTTC involves using existing connections to the home, so there is no digging up pavements or installing new overhead lines to each property. Read more

The Causes Of A Slow Wi-Fi Router And How To Fix It

router, wireless, digital, broadband, internet,It’s no good having up to 900 Mbps Full Fibre if your Wi-Fi connection to your devices is slow. You could plug an ethernet cable from your computer to the router, but that defeats the point of Wi-Fi, and what about all the devices which can’t be plugged in? There are several reasons for poor Wi-Fi, some of which could need investment in extenders, Point to Point transmitters, and mesh discs, but some of them are simple solutions you can take care of in a few minutes.

Router Placement

Where your router is positioned within the home can have an incredible effect on the speed your internet connected devices work. Placing it near the front door, where the cable comes into your home, seems like an obvious idea, but if most of your internet use takes place at the back of the house, upstairs, or in a home office located in the garden then the distance the signal has to travel, and the obstacles it has to pass through can have a great effect on the amount of bandwidth available to each machine.

To overcome this, simply place your router nearer where the action is. If your family doesn’t all sit in the same room to access the internet (and what family would!?) try to place the router at the centre of the home. This means that each laptop, phone, smart speaker and TV will have an equal opportunity to get signal. And place it somewhere high up. It might be tempting to put it on the floor behind a desk, somewhere out of the way, but putting it on the desk, or better yet on a high shelf. This extends the broadcast range and means less objects the signal has to pass through before reaching your device. Read more

Why Briant Broadband Is Different From The Big Boys Of Internet Data

broadband, ISP, internet service provider, full fibre, wireless, wireless internet, A while ago someone unfriendly left a comment on Briant Broadband’s Facebook page about how he couldn’t trust a small ISP because we didn’t have the same clout as the “big boys”. It left us wondering if he thought we were cooking up data in a still in the back garden, or how he thought that any internet provider came about.

As an ISP it’s our job to ensure that you get the best speeds available. We need to ensure that your connection is stable and reliable, and we need to ensure that you get it at the best price. If that wasn’t enough juggling, because Briant Broadband is an installer as well as a data provider we need to provide routers, wireless receivers, and even pull fibre cable under the ground or suspend it from telegraph poles in order to connect you to our service. We are partnered with CityFibre, a national company who are deeply embedded in the scheme to roll out fibre connectivity to 99% of British homes by 2030, but there are some areas they aren’t going to be able to reach for years. And some areas, such as private housing developments and gated communities, as well as particularly remote homesteads where they may never reach at all.

Briant Broadband have solutions. In one remote private estate we established a wireless solution so homes in the area can all benefit from Superfast internet at speeds up to 200 Mbps whereas before they had to rely on copper phone lines for their internet connection which delivered around 10 or 20 Mbps. Another solution which is open to us is to install our own fibre network, connecting all the houses in a community to our own spine and then connecting that to CityFibre’s infrastructure. Read more

Not Connected To Full Fibre Yet? Wireless Broadband Could Be For You

wireless, wireless broadband, superfast broadband, broadband, internet, ISPSure you’ve heard of Wi-Fi, but it’s not the same thing as Wireless broadband. Wi-Fi is the process by which you send and receive internet data between your computer, connected devices, Smart TV and phone when you’re not using your data allowance. Wireless broadband on the other hand is the way your internet service provider gets data to your house if Full Fibre or Fibre to the Cabinet aren’t currently available in your area.

How Does Wireless Internet Work?

Wireless is different from Wi-Fi, 4g or GSM (the mobile phone network) as it does a different job using different technology. Wireless is deployed in areas, such as remote rural areas as it is an cost effective alternative to laying fibre optic cables or installing phone transmitters which might provide coverage which will only reach a few customers. Instead of having phone masts put up, these remote areas have internet ‘beamed’ to them via a mast which the Wireless Internet Service Provider (WISP) installs and trains on the area they wish to cover. So long as you can get ‘line of sight’ between the receiver which the ISP provides and their transmitter, you will be able to get high speed broadband. The speeds you can get may not be as fast as Full Fibre or Fibre to the Cabinet (FTTC), but they will certainly be far better than anything which was previously available using old copper phone infrastructure. Read more

Full Fibre, FTTP, FTTH and FTTC. What Is Going On!?

fibre, fibre optic, fibre optic cable, FTTP, FTTH, FTTC, Full Fibre, Fibre Broadband, broadband, fast fibre, If you’re shopping around for a new broadband internet provider because your old one was too expensive or unreliable you’ve probably been introduced to some new terms which we shall attempt to explain.

You’ll no doubt have heard of FTTC, FTTP and FTTH. The good news is that Full Fibre, FTTP and FTTH are exactly the same thing. They stand for ‘Fibre To The Property’ and ‘Fibre To the Home’ so essentially they both mean that the fibre connection goes all the way from your local exchange down your street, across your garden, through the wall and into your router. Once its there it can deliver up to 900 Mbps which can then be distributed via Wi-Fi or an ethernet cable directly to a laptop or desktop machine, Smart devices and TV.

So what is FTTC?

FTTC is ‘Fibre To The Cabinet’. The cabinet in question is the green phone cabinet you probably have at the end of your street. Sometimes you’ll see a phone engineer sitting in front of one deftly knitting among a bird’s nest of cables and you wonder how they can possibly make any sense of the jumble of wires in front of them. So the fibre goes from the exchange, down your street, but instead of going across your garden and into your wall, it stops at this cabinet and gets connected to your copper phone line instead. Because the copper wire is already installed right up the phone socket in your home it’s much cheaper to install and far less disruptive as there is much less digging of residential streets involved. Dynamic Line Management takes care of ensuring that your connection remains, error free, fast and stable automatically. Read more

ISP Throttling, What Is It And What You Can Do About It

slow internet throttling by ISPSometimes there are technical issues which mean that your internet service provider isn’t able to deliver the speeds you thought you were going to get. Sometimes they deliberately keep your speeds lower through throttling because they never had any intention of delivering the maximum in the first place.

It sounds like it should be a case for trading standards doesn’t it? Advertising maximum speeds without ever having the intention to achieve those top speeds, but the catch is they advertise “speeds up to…” without expressly stating that you will actually get the maximum speeds they offer.

What are we talking about when we mention throttling

ISPs are in the business of selling broadband, and to do so they have to make their packages look as attractive as possible, so they advertise speeds ‘up to’ the maximum available on that plan. The problem is that while you may get those speeds when the internet is least busy, you can’t really expect them all the time.

That’s understandable, the higher the demand the slower the speeds due to congestion and processing. The problem is when your ISP deliberately throttles your internet because they want you to have lower speeds. You may experience it all the time, at particular times of day, or when visiting particular websites. Read more

Should You Choose Wi-Fi or Ethernet Internet Connection?

ethernet cables plugged into the back of networking hardware.Currently you have two options when connecting your PC or Mac to the internet, you can do it wirelessly or use an ethernet cable. While it’s far more convenient to connect via Wi-Fi, there are drawbacks. Sure you can take your laptop wherever you go in the house if it’s not connected directly to the router, but do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages?

Speed and stability are most people’s main concerns. Consumers want to get what they want quickly, and to know that the internet is going to be there as soon as they log on and stay consistent until they log off again. Measuring your internet speed is easy and only takes a few moments. When you do a speed test you’ll find that you have an upload speed which probably differs quite a bit from your download speed. Upload speed is the amount of time it takes to send information into the internet. When you send an email or share photos to Facebook and Instagram, that’s upload.

Download speeds are the thing most people are going to be concerned about, and that’s why more bandwidth is dedicated to getting information from the internet into your computer. Download speed determines how fast your movies stream, meaning that they shouldn’t buffer or freeze while you’re watching, it determines how quickly an album will download and how soon after connecting to a website you will see the pictures. Read more

How Wireless Technology Continues To Help You Work From Home

wireless, wireless broadband, superfast broadband, broadband, internet, ISPAre you going to be affected by the train strikes this week, and a proposed teacher’s strike later on in the year?

The post-Covid recovery didn’t last long, did it? We were hoping that we could all get back to work, the economy would level out and we’d all be looking at better future, free of lockdowns and masks.

But what Covid did show us was that we’re OK working from home if it’s not possible to get into the office. In fact the structure for many offices has changed with meetings in the same building being conducted online, making sharing documents, visualisations and other assets immediately available to everyone. No need to find a meeting room and drag everyone away from their desk, making the meeting as low-impact as possible.

The only drawback for many people who have to commute, even if it’s just a few stops is the quality of internet they get. People living and working in Worthing, Hove, Brighton, and Chichester are lucky enough to get the latest broadband technology. On the other hand people living in the sticks have to suffer with technology which hasn’t been updated for decades, and was never designed to handle the amount of traffic that an online community working from home need. Briant Broadband’s Wireless internet service is the answer to that. Read more